Tomorrow…

Yes, tomorrow is 9/11.

I remember sitting here, in my nice relatively new home, having only been in the US for a few months, and watching reruns of ER until my sister called from Canada, her voice trembling as she told me to switch channels.

And I watched.

And watched.

At that time the Wookie was working not all that far from where Flight 93 went down. I tried to get through to him for a few frantic minutes, until the lines cleared and he confirmed that he wasn’t as close to the crash site as the preliminary reports had it.

We had a friend staying with us. I mentally made plans to load up the truck with supplies, two cats and meet hubby somewhere on the way to Canada, if need be.

Fortunately, it wasn’t necessary. Wookie came home, we cried, and I watched and did a whole lotta praying.

In Second Life, a virtual world I live and play in, there’s a memorial.

I went by today, just to see it, and found this. I don’t know who put the rose there.

’nuff said.

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4 thoughts on “Tomorrow…

  1. I guess we have a slightly different viewpoint of 9/11 here in SA. The first I heard of it was from my Muslim colleagues, who were less than sympathetic toward the Americans, and the majority of the people I spoke to were mainly concerned that the USA would drag the rest of the world into a WWIII. Luckily the latter hasn’t happened but it does bug me that there is so much conflict in the ME and the amount of money that is spent trying to keep the peace.
    Dunno, here in Africa, I have to deal with the daily stress of not knowing what sort of death I’ll narrowly miss. When you live with the spectre of violent crime dangling above your head you kind of take a pragmatic approach of living each day as if it were your last.
    It’s really shite that this 9/11 thing had to happen but the thing is, there are so many other atrocities that never make it to the media with so much vivid detail.
    ‘Round about now I’m thinking of the recent Rwandan genocide where approximately one million people lost their lives over 100 days. That was a lot closer to home than any of the bad stuff that’s happened in the States, ME or Europe. And the world turned a cold shoulder on that disaster. You don’t really hear people make a big fuss over it.
    The figures are staggering, however, if you consider the amount of death that occurs when a MILLION people die over three months. I met Rwandans who ran from their home. They don’t know if they’ll ever see their loved ones again, let alone what happened to them. It’s heartbreaking.

    • actually, the Rwandan genocide is pretty close to a lot of Canadian hearts – the UN forces there were led by a Canadian who was crippled by the UN decisions and had to stand by and let people die. He later on suffered mental problems and retired. But we got graphic images of what he had to do, or not do, because of the UN tying his hands.
      it was a fiasco that the UN has never recovered from, IMO. I still don’t trust them to do anything right, given that they allowed that to happen.
      imo, of course.

  2. I guess we have a slightly different viewpoint of 9/11 here in SA. The first I heard of it was from my Muslim colleagues, who were less than sympathetic toward the Americans, and the majority of the people I spoke to were mainly concerned that the USA would drag the rest of the world into a WWIII. Luckily the latter hasn’t happened but it does bug me that there is so much conflict in the ME and the amount of money that is spent trying to keep the peace.
    Dunno, here in Africa, I have to deal with the daily stress of not knowing what sort of death I’ll narrowly miss. When you live with the spectre of violent crime dangling above your head you kind of take a pragmatic approach of living each day as if it were your last.
    It’s really shite that this 9/11 thing had to happen but the thing is, there are so many other atrocities that never make it to the media with so much vivid detail.
    ‘Round about now I’m thinking of the recent Rwandan genocide where approximately one million people lost their lives over 100 days. That was a lot closer to home than any of the bad stuff that’s happened in the States, ME or Europe. And the world turned a cold shoulder on that disaster. You don’t really hear people make a big fuss over it.
    The figures are staggering, however, if you consider the amount of death that occurs when a MILLION people die over three months. I met Rwandans who ran from their home. They don’t know if they’ll ever see their loved ones again, let alone what happened to them. It’s heartbreaking.

    • actually, the Rwandan genocide is pretty close to a lot of Canadian hearts – the UN forces there were led by a Canadian who was crippled by the UN decisions and had to stand by and let people die. He later on suffered mental problems and retired. But we got graphic images of what he had to do, or not do, because of the UN tying his hands.
      it was a fiasco that the UN has never recovered from, IMO. I still don’t trust them to do anything right, given that they allowed that to happen.
      imo, of course.

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