sometimes you need a light touch…

I guess this needs to be prefaced with a short story about how I learned to type.

You younglings may not remember this, but WAY back in the past there were typewriters. Not sleek, cool electric typewriters that hummed when you turned them on and danced around the page, but large killer clunkers that you had to hammer on the keys as if you were pounding in a nail; punching through a fabric ink-dipped ribbon to get a letter onto the page.

that is what I learned on. It sat in a case where you could lock down the top and transport it, probably causing a hernia along the way if you really had to move it more than once a year. But I sat there and hammered out my first words. Lord knows where it is now…

anyway, for years my husband has chastised me for keeping the same pressure up on my poor little keyboard – slamming my fingers down on the keys as if I were trying to punch through that ribbon still. He claims that he can hear me anywhere in the house when I get on a roll and I don’t doubt him.

which was all fine, until about a year ago when I broke my left little finger due to a foul ball slamming into my left arm and bouncing up my hand, breaking the finger.

eep.

three months in a small brace and since then it’s been weaker than ever – aches during bad weather and yes, painful to type. I’ve had to literally remember to only brush my finger over the keys; not pound them ’cause it hurts so much. I expect there’s some sort of story there about early arthritis and all that and no, can’t sue the ballpark. Although I’m never going to a game again.

ANYWAY, every time I have that pain in my finger (which is quite often, since I’m a Bear of Little Thought when I get on a roll) I remember that sometimes you don’t need to hammer at something to get the best result. Sometimes a light touch will get the job done much easier and with less pain than slamming into it at full force.

meanwhile, I’ve become heavily addicted to Zyngo in Second Life, still sending out poetry and working on "Blaze of Glory". I’m determined to not settle for the small presses this time around; life’s too short to spend my time hawking a book that you won’t find on shelves unless I put it here. All or nothing.

at least for the novels. Poetry, well… that’s another thing.

over and out.

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18 thoughts on “sometimes you need a light touch…

  1. I have great fun befuddling people when I look at them and say “you learned to type on a mechanical typewriter, didn’t you?” It’s not hard – you just have to look at their laptop keyboard and see how worn down it is.
    -JM

  2. I have great fun befuddling people when I look at them and say “you learned to type on a mechanical typewriter, didn’t you?” It’s not hard – you just have to look at their laptop keyboard and see how worn down it is.
    -JM

  3. I learned to type on a real typewriter too! I still even have drafts of one my first couple novels typed on it! However, I am a very light typer now. Mostly cuz I’m lazy and don’t have that kind of energy to expend!

  4. I learned to type on a real typewriter too! I still even have drafts of one my first couple novels typed on it! However, I am a very light typer now. Mostly cuz I’m lazy and don’t have that kind of energy to expend!

  5. Ooo! Ooo! Storytime! I was homeschooled in first grade (because my mom had no idea what else she could do with me), and I had a manual typewriter. Then, I did enrichment after third grade, and I took typing class on a manual typewriter with colored paint over the keys so we couldn’t actually see the letters. I got my first home computer later that same summer, and I’ve never done manual again.

  6. Ooo! Ooo! Storytime! I was homeschooled in first grade (because my mom had no idea what else she could do with me), and I had a manual typewriter. Then, I did enrichment after third grade, and I took typing class on a manual typewriter with colored paint over the keys so we couldn’t actually see the letters. I got my first home computer later that same summer, and I’ve never done manual again.

  7. I, too, learned to type on a Behemoth. My mother bought a giant cast-iron Remington for $25 for me to learn on at home. I think she paid $1 a pound. The typewriter looked like one of the old clunkers in the newsrooms in black-and-white movies, and whenever I typed “o” too hard, it would cut a hole in the paper.
    I probably type a bit harder than I should, but I don’t think I could go back to a manual typewriter with ease. For one thing, the keys are too far apart for someone who’s used to typing on a laptop, and there’s no handy delete key. 😉
    I’m sorry to hear about your little finger. These days I have aches in my knees when I forget to sit properly. Sigh. Age sucks.
    Go for the big presses! Is it the distribution and marketing that’s the problem with small presses?

    • basically – my current publisher doesn’t even try to market my book and for all the money I’ve put into promotion (ad in RT, getting a review/recommendation from a USA Today best-selling author, bookmarks) I’ve only made maybe about a hundred bucks. And put out much more.
      in addition there’s just no money in it – for each book I get into a bookstore to sell I get about eighty-five cents. Yep, $0.85. That’s due to the contract not spelling out what I get and the publisher/printer/warehousers get most of the money. So it’s just not worth the trouble. Not to mention that I’m not going to spend hundreds of money on my own book to resell at conventions, cons and out of the trunk of my car, which is what most POD presses live on.
      if I’m going to do that I’ll do it with poetry, which is a harder sell to the public. But that’s my take.
      😛

  8. I, too, learned to type on a Behemoth. My mother bought a giant cast-iron Remington for $25 for me to learn on at home. I think she paid $1 a pound. The typewriter looked like one of the old clunkers in the newsrooms in black-and-white movies, and whenever I typed “o” too hard, it would cut a hole in the paper.
    I probably type a bit harder than I should, but I don’t think I could go back to a manual typewriter with ease. For one thing, the keys are too far apart for someone who’s used to typing on a laptop, and there’s no handy delete key. 😉
    I’m sorry to hear about your little finger. These days I have aches in my knees when I forget to sit properly. Sigh. Age sucks.
    Go for the big presses! Is it the distribution and marketing that’s the problem with small presses?

    • basically – my current publisher doesn’t even try to market my book and for all the money I’ve put into promotion (ad in RT, getting a review/recommendation from a USA Today best-selling author, bookmarks) I’ve only made maybe about a hundred bucks. And put out much more.
      in addition there’s just no money in it – for each book I get into a bookstore to sell I get about eighty-five cents. Yep, $0.85. That’s due to the contract not spelling out what I get and the publisher/printer/warehousers get most of the money. So it’s just not worth the trouble. Not to mention that I’m not going to spend hundreds of money on my own book to resell at conventions, cons and out of the trunk of my car, which is what most POD presses live on.
      if I’m going to do that I’ll do it with poetry, which is a harder sell to the public. But that’s my take.
      😛

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